New tank or retro fit with pump

This area is for those who need help modernizing their Lincoln for purposes other than strict restoration. Such questions can be about adding an electric fuel pump, adding fuel injection, boosting horsepower or gas mileage, or tightening or lowering the suspension. Body customizing and chopping can also be here (although this practice is not encouraged by the LCOC).

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Re: New tank or retro fit with pump

Postby stevedrums » Sat Dec 19, 2020 12:07 am

another option to keep the original tank with EFI
https://fitechefi.com/product/force-fuel-system/
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Re: New tank or retro fit with pump

Postby jame04 » Sat Dec 26, 2020 6:36 pm

Certainly cheaper and a good option, but I figured a 52 year old tank could use replacing. The EFI install was easy.

stevedrums wrote:another option to keep the original tank with EFI
https://fitechefi.com/product/force-fuel-system/
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Re: New tank or retro fit with pump

Postby bd94s10 » Sun Jan 31, 2021 5:43 pm

jame04, Jeff (Devious Customs) makes some awesome products.


The easiest way to add pics is to set up a free Flikr account (https://www.flickr.com). You then click on You > Photostream via Flikr. Select a photo and then click the share button. I change the drop-down to 500x375 (medium) and then copy that code above the dropdown. Paste the drop-down here like I did below for a misc pic

ImageUntitled by Jason Ballard, on Flickr

Hope this helps!
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Re: New tank or retro fit with pump

Postby Mike » Mon Feb 01, 2021 11:54 am

I wouldn't be too concerned about the in tank pump as long as its some sort of standard one that's easy to find when it needs to be replaced.
Did you change the gas lines? Higher pressure with pump in back needs solid supply line, not ones with pieces of hose here and there to make them easier to install like the factory ones are.
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and a couple Chryslers and Cadillacs
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Re: New tank or retro fit with pump

Postby jame04 » Mon Feb 01, 2021 10:03 pm

Mike wrote:I wouldn't be too concerned about the in tank pump as long as its some sort of standard one that's easy to find when it needs to be replaced.
Did you change the gas lines? Higher pressure with pump in back needs solid supply line, not ones with pieces of hose here and there to make them easier to install like the factory ones are.


The stock metal lines are newer and in good shape. All new lines everywhere else.

I fired it up today finally. So far so good, but we have a foot of snow on the ground so will have to wait to drive it.

Will set up a Flickr account and post some pics.
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Re: New tank or retro fit with pump

Postby Mike » Tue Feb 02, 2021 12:02 am

So new line is solid from tank to intake? The stock style set up wasn't designed to be pressurized and doesn't play well with 58psi fuel pressure.
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Re: New tank or retro fit with pump

Postby TonyC » Wed Feb 03, 2021 2:19 am

I may remain the lone voice of dissent on this topic and that's fine, but I see electric conversions for fuel pumps to be severely overrated and woefully under-analyzed. First, unless you happen to have a lift built into your garage, putting a fuel pump in the tank is one of the most ridiculous ideas ever. The manufacturers do that only to make sure that customers remain dependent on the dealer networks for repairs. At least the Audi I used to have kept its pump outside, making it relatively easy to access...which I suppose they had to do because the Series-80 did not have a fuel tank per-se; the fuel storage was built into the body, it was not a separate piece.

But I digress. Many starry-eyed shade-tree customizers do not bother to factor in two major things about electric pumps, and many times they find out the hard way. First, electric pumps inherently give off far more pressure than mechanical ones, too much in fact for a carburetor to tolerate. The remedies for that are to either find an electric pump that has the ability to adjust its pressure output down, or convert the whole ruddy fuel-delivery system to EFI (if you have that much money to burn, then the latter may sound more appealing). Second, almost nobody thinks about the safety factor. Electric pumps are not regulated by the engine like mechanical ones are; so in a collision, that pump will not stop pushing fuel unless you turn the key off...and who really thinks about making that first priority in the aftermath of a collision? Factory-brand makes know that is ridiculous to believe, which is why they also have to install a safety circuit into the fuel system, which will automatically kill the power to the fuel pump and thus kill off the flow of fuel in a collision, to prevent the "Pinto Syndrome." Most of the time it works, though not all the time. But the point is that hardly anybody thinks of putting in some kind of safety-kill system in these shade-tree conversions. Even though such systems, I've been told, do exist in the aftermarket, I'm willing to place a month's pension that the majority of converters do not even think about that. Of course, if enough such converters read this admonition, they probably might rethink their ways and start putting them in, just to collect on my pension. :? :lol:

Personally, I don't see any justification for a just-because conversion to an electric pump when the mechanical pump for MELs is designed to last a long time and designed to be repaired, not replaced, when it does give trouble. I will not say that I have not had fuel pump troubles; I have. BUT, not one incident I had ever was beyond my ability to fix right on the spot. Even if I had to remove the pump to address the problem, it was easy-peasy to do that in a matter of just a few minutes because of its location. Now, for non-MELs, everything I just indicated doesn't really apply, as pumps made after the MEL era were never designed to be repaired or even easily accessed. Where those are concerned, I can fully understand why so many people think about an electric conversion...but for God's sake, at least shell out the extra $ to install a safety-kill system as well.

---Tony
"Don't believe everything you read on the Internet, just because there is a picture with a quote next to it." (Abraham Lincoln, 1866)
"Question Authority!"

1966 Continental Sedan, affectionately known as "Frankenstein" until body restoration is done (to be renamed "General Sherman" on that event)
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Re: New tank or retro fit with pump

Postby JimA » Wed Feb 03, 2021 11:37 am

The reason I went to electric fuel pump on my 1978 was to solve the vapor lock issues. Tried every less dramatic change I could think of but none solved the problem. An electric fuel pump and bypass regulator to keep the fuel circulating was the solution. I did include an inertia switch in the installation and TOTALLY agree there should be some safety cutoff included with any electric fuel pump. On another car where I installed an electric fuel pump, a relay was included to cut power to the pump when oil pressure dropped. Both safety devices would be good 'cause they work with different scenarios.

In-tank pump has the advantage of keeping the pump cool.
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Re: New tank or retro fit with pump

Postby jame04 » Wed Feb 03, 2021 12:17 pm

I'm running EFI. The pump is regulated as is the EFI/ECU. I'm maintaining 43-45 PSI. The ECU shuts the pump off when not calling for fuel. The devious tank is very easy to install and remove allowing for easy pump replacement....if I ever have to. I agree with what you are saying, IF I were stock. I've replaced my share of pumps, including having to cut a hole in the floor under the rear seat to get to one. BTW, love my lift!

TonyC wrote:I may remain the lone voice of dissent on this topic and that's fine, but I see electric conversions for fuel pumps to be severely overrated and woefully under-analyzed. First, unless you happen to have a lift built into your garage, putting a fuel pump in the tank is one of the most ridiculous ideas ever. The manufacturers do that only to make sure that customers remain dependent on the dealer networks for repairs. At least the Audi I used to have kept its pump outside, making it relatively easy to access...which I suppose they had to do because the Series-80 did not have a fuel tank per-se; the fuel storage was built into the body, it was not a separate piece.

But I digress. Many starry-eyed shade-tree customizers do not bother to factor in two major things about electric pumps, and many times they find out the hard way. First, electric pumps inherently give off far more pressure than mechanical ones, too much in fact for a carburetor to tolerate. The remedies for that are to either find an electric pump that has the ability to adjust its pressure output down, or convert the whole ruddy fuel-delivery system to EFI (if you have that much money to burn, then the latter may sound more appealing). Second, almost nobody thinks about the safety factor. Electric pumps are not regulated by the engine like mechanical ones are; so in a collision, that pump will not stop pushing fuel unless you turn the key off...and who really thinks about making that first priority in the aftermath of a collision? Factory-brand makes know that is ridiculous to believe, which is why they also have to install a safety circuit into the fuel system, which will automatically kill the power to the fuel pump and thus kill off the flow of fuel in a collision, to prevent the "Pinto Syndrome." Most of the time it works, though not all the time. But the point is that hardly anybody thinks of putting in some kind of safety-kill system in these shade-tree conversions. Even though such systems, I've been told, do exist in the aftermarket, I'm willing to place a month's pension that the majority of converters do not even think about that. Of course, if enough such converters read this admonition, they probably might rethink their ways and start putting them in, just to collect on my pension. :? :lol:

Personally, I don't see any justification for a just-because conversion to an electric pump when the mechanical pump for MELs is designed to last a long time and designed to be repaired, not replaced, when it does give trouble. I will not say that I have not had fuel pump troubles; I have. BUT, not one incident I had ever was beyond my ability to fix right on the spot. Even if I had to remove the pump to address the problem, it was easy-peasy to do that in a matter of just a few minutes because of its location. Now, for non-MELs, everything I just indicated doesn't really apply, as pumps made after the MEL era were never designed to be repaired or even easily accessed. Where those are concerned, I can fully understand why so many people think about an electric conversion...but for God's sake, at least shell out the extra $ to install a safety-kill system as well.

---Tony
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Re: New tank or retro fit with pump

Postby brkdncr » Mon Mar 29, 2021 3:05 pm

Modern EFI conversions include pump shutdown. Most use tach signal.
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Re: New tank or retro fit with pump

Postby Wixomhead » Mon Apr 25, 2022 4:05 pm

I am adding EFI to my 71 Mark III w/ 460. The tank in the 71 is upright between the back seat and trunk. I want to source a brand new tank and fab an in-tank pump. I have yet to find a practical/affordable 60psi external pump that doesn't sound like an electric shaver over the whisper quiet of my Mark III exhaust. #hatethat

Spectra Premium says their part no. F27A - which looks damn close to a Mark III - fits a 1971 Continental as well as 2 door Mercury Marquis and many full sides fords - but does not fit the Mark III or a Thunderbird.

They say they have no tank that fits my sporty two door coupe.

Anyone know any different? I do not want to go with universal custom tank....
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Re: New tank or retro fit with pump

Postby brkdncr » Thu May 12, 2022 1:34 pm

Fitech also offers a surge tank setup in 3 sizes. I have the large, single pump on a 390FE and it works well. You keep your mechanical pump to fill the surge tank, and there's an EFI pump to supply high PSI fuel to the injectors.

I have an in-line pump on my '61 linc that came with a F.A.S.T EFI master kit and it's awful. It's loud, running the lines was a pain, and something is wrong with it as it has a horrible whine after a few minutes. I'm going to drop the tank and redo the lines and go with the fitech mini.
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