[MOVED] - Custom Fuel filter

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[MOVED] - Custom Fuel filter

Postby denizen44 » Thu Jun 18, 2020 1:28 pm

Greetings friends,

I have this project for an entirely "hard" fuel line leading to the carb, and got a new fuel filter for it.

But I've been told by an expert, that this kind of filter(although lebeled "universal") would NOT fit my 1406-Linc, because such filters were designed for high pressure applications(i.e. modern cars) and that using this on a '70s linc would stress or overwhelm the fuel pump.
Blowing AIR through it sure doesn't seem to resist much though .... There is no valve inside whatsoever.
Filtration is rated at 100 microns, and Edelbrock 8130 is rated at 40 microns. Just how many microns is adequate?

Does anyone have relevant experience/wisdom/warnings to share?

Image
Image

Simulated here:
Image
Last edited by denizen44 on Sun Apr 11, 2021 8:27 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: Fuel filter

Postby action » Thu Jun 18, 2020 7:15 pm

I could be wrong and I think you are over thinking the mission.

This is a non-fuel injected gasoline engine. In practice it will take and burn a lot of junk and still be happy. And I get that you are looking to remove any debris from making it's way into the engine. Kudos for that thought process.

But it is a non-fuel injected engine. So there isn't a situation where fuel is being pushed through a fine opening of a fuel injector. Much cleaner fuel is needed for that type of system.

Gasoline is pretty darn clean coming out of the pump. Especially from a station that pumps a lot of fuel. Tanks at a station like Costco get filled and empties at least a couple times a week. This supply movement is excellent as the chance of fuel absorbing moisture is very low. And the opportunity for fuel to corrode anything in the supply chain is low as well be because the fuel does not stay in one place for long. If the vehicle is a daily driver or a vehicle that is driven regularly then that fuel movement continues until it is burned in the combustion chamber.

The issue become a concern when fuel sits like a hobby car. And especially in a hobby car that has a vented or non-sealed fuel system. Humid of moist air can get into the fuel tank or into the carb bowl and the fuel can absorb that moisture over long period of time. It is of greater concern in higher humid areas and areas that have humidity and great temperature swings such that humid air condenses. Even if the moisture does not get absorbed into the fuel in a tank, just being on the bare metal of the tank means corrosion.

So instead of getting a filter that will take that stuff out, fill the tank. If there is no air in the tank no moisture can get in. In addition too fine a filter has the potential to plug up. And a gasoline engine will burn most of that anyway.

You can add finer filters, and using the vehicle and storing with full tanks solves most of that anyway.

>>>>>>>Action
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Re: Fuel filter

Postby denizen44 » Thu Jun 18, 2020 7:59 pm

This is all useful info, and I do fill up my tank. :D
But I need to choose a new filter system for a hard fuel line project.
Here are the potential issues I can list:
-Flow: I'm 100% positive that these filters offer sufficient flow. Any other flow things to consider?
-Pressure: could it be true that my fuel pump is not adequate for this kind of filter?
-Micron rating: I might have found the answer, despite having 10, 40 &100 micron filters to choose from, I think I'll follow the recommendations on this page and go for the 40 microns. Also, steel mesh models are(neatly) washable.
-Compatibility with a Lincoln environment: do you see any other issues that might arise from using these filters?
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Re: Fuel filter

Postby Galaxie65s » Fri Jun 19, 2020 1:19 am

Very nice project! That'll look great! I'm with Action on this one. He hit all the major issues. If you can blow through it easily it should flow ok. If you have any doubt, you could do a simple gravity feed test before installing to check flow. I did a little googling on the stock filter (Wix 33046) and the micron rating for it is 12! What you have will serve you well IMO.

I also have plans to install a hard line from pump to carb and use filter mount from a boat that accepts the big old Ford cartridge filters that are easy to change and easy to come by.

Good luck!
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Re: Fuel filter

Postby papawayne » Fri Jun 19, 2020 5:44 am

I'm cheap. On my 63, I use the standard deal for a fuel filter, and if I think of it when I take the car out in the spring, I swap it out. Which reminds me I haven't done that yet. In all my years, I've only plugged a filter once. It happened to be at a show, and I changed it in the parking lot. The liquid that came out if it was pretty black. Wayne
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Re: Fuel filter

Postby action » Fri Jun 19, 2020 10:07 am

denizen44 wrote:But I need to choose a new filter system for a hard fuel line project.


On your Continental?
Why?

If the answer is yes for the first question, it is like you are hiring a millennial with a master's degree to be the door greeter at your store.
The job gets done but the price you will pay in design and fabrication is kind of a waste.


Action
Phoenix - Yeah, it's hot, however it's a dry heat
2006 Lincoln Navigator Limited 5.4l 3V
1996 Lincoln Mark VIII 2DR Coupe Diamond Anniversary 4.6l DOHC, 4R70W, 3.07
1970 Continental Mark III Triple Black 460 4v, C6, 2.80 (Used for Woodward Dream Cruise or just generally stored in Michigan)
1966 Lincoln Continental 4DR Convertible 462 4v, C6, 3.00
1966 Mercury Park Lane 4DR Breezeway 410 4v, C6, 2.80
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Re: Fuel filter

Postby denizen44 » Fri Jun 19, 2020 10:40 am

action wrote:Why?

I've had at least two different mishaps with rubber hoses or clamps that broke or loosened,
resulting in gas leaks. One time it almost resulted in an engine bay fire.
Hence my acquisition of a glove box fire extinguisher.
I know such failures are not SUPER common but they are more likely in regions(like Canada) with 60+degree yearly temperature swings.
Plus, I just prefer the reliability of a hard line... I'm pretty sure I'm not the only one.
I've had this project in mind eversince that first incident.

it is like you are hiring a millennial with a master's degree to be the door greeter at your store.

This "upgrade" isn't foremost about filtration! Not even close.
I foremost want to use AN6 connections.
And starting from that requirement, I have to do some research to select the correct filter and associated housing that are available for this kind of setup. Reasonable cost is also taken into account... To avoid overspending(like, $150 for a filter) is PRECISELY what I'm trying to do.

The job gets done but the price you will pay in design and fabrication is kind of a waste.

That black filter you see pictured above? Cost me a mere $16, one year ago.
Not exactly a fortune... I also found fittings(several) with an average cost of.... $2.
Again, worth it...
EVEN if I manage prevent just....... one little catastrophe?

Now please, shall we go back to the technical issues? :D
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Re: Fuel filter

Postby action » Fri Jun 19, 2020 11:44 am

You don't have to get excited. No one knows what you are doing because your question and thread title is focused on a fuel filter.

Rubber hoses, the clamps and the fuel filters should be changed annually.
Especially in climates with large temp swings
That is the enviroment where condensation builds. Filter replacement is more important in that climate.

You are building a hydraulic hose system for a fuel system that was designed for 8 to 12 PSI at the carb.
At either end you still have to make an adapter to connect the pump and to connect the carb.
Those connections won't be "bullet" proof.
In addition that type of system isn't make for repeated assembly and disassembly on a regular scheduled maintenance to replace that filter.
It can work but the function of that kind of system is to maintain leak proof system under high pressure over long periods of time.
The purpose of a filter is to be replace periodically to remove debris so it doesn't get into the carb and so it doesn't obstruct the fuel flow.

The filter is the cheap part. All of the custom lines, fitting and adapters add up. But that isn't the real cost.
The real cost is in the labor and effort for a system that at either end (Carb or fuel pump) will still NOT be connected with that type of connection.
Unless you are remaking the carb inlet and the fuel pump outlet.

Periodic maintenance is part of the deal with these vehicles. And with any machinery.
Maintenance free was a poor market choice to use on batteries. But that term has a lot of appeal.

Knock your socks off.
As for me I am in the Pappawayne camp.
No thoughts on designing, making and worrying about the end connectors leaking because the carb wasn't designed for hydraulic hoses.
Just buy a lot of stock replacement filters, clamps and fuel lines. (Don't reuse that stuff!) Replace on mileage or time which ever comes first.

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2006 Lincoln Navigator Limited 5.4l 3V
1996 Lincoln Mark VIII 2DR Coupe Diamond Anniversary 4.6l DOHC, 4R70W, 3.07
1970 Continental Mark III Triple Black 460 4v, C6, 2.80 (Used for Woodward Dream Cruise or just generally stored in Michigan)
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Re: Fuel filter

Postby Mike » Fri Jun 19, 2020 11:56 am

Most people never have any problems with hose and clamps so it's strange that you've had it happen twice now. Where did it come apart? Whatever is happening isn't due to regional temperature swings that's nothing compared to the regular temperature changes under the hood every time the car is driven.

With all the fittings you have going on with that filter setup you'd be better off leaving things the way it was originally designed. Typically you want as few fittings as possible because every one of them is one more spot to have leaks and the chances increase when they're on top of the engine like that.

To accomplish what you're trying to do it would be better to simplify things and junk that fancy filter for one that's like the silver one with screw type fittings on both ends of it and replace the metal fuel lines with ones that have flared ends with connections like brake lines have.

If your mind is set on the black filter which it sounds like you've already got it planned out and already have all the parts you need so put it together and try it. I don't know if anyone pays attention to microns for fuel filters, pretty much any filter will do the job. maybe check with Edelbrock and see what info they have about it.
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Re: Fuel filter

Postby denizen44 » Fri Jun 19, 2020 3:06 pm

The real cost is in the labor and effort for a system that at either end (Carb or fuel pump) will still NOT be connected with that type of connection.
Unless you are remaking the carb inlet and the fuel pump outlet.

Well, in my case that idea is not as crazy as it seems: my carb already happens to have the AN6 inlet addon, which I am currently "downgrading" to a rubber hose...
Adding just one more appropriate fitting would allow me to connect the other end of the solid filter to the 5/16 steel line(with flared ends) which already has to be present to reach the fuel pump. Current plan calls for re-bending a new version of that segment, but the cheap cost of this and learning experience make it all worthwhile for me.

Rubber hoses, the clamps and the fuel filters should be changed annually..

With that large washable steel mesh filter element and the easily unscrewable housing, one could hope to avoid this, likely for many years.

Most tech people I spoke to about this have responded by now, and most agree a 40 micron filter is the best choice at carb-level.
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Re: Fuel filter

Postby denizen44 » Sat Apr 10, 2021 8:23 am

After several delays, at last this small project is done!

disclaimer: I had no aim to improve OEM filtration or moisture management, or even to be cost effective.
I just don't love rubber hoses & clamps as much as I do hard lines.
So basically, a completely useless and super fun time wasting operation. :D

these filters are very common and inexpensive, essentially a chinese copy of filters costing 10 times more, such as Aeromotive, Radium & others.
I would have preferred a silver filter, but the fittings are much more widely available in black.
Filter is 100% symmetrical with no indications for flow direction.
I paid $15(including shipping) and the quality is surprizingly good: all edges perfect, nice finish, rubber ring seals all over, same stainless steel element as many others, abundant surface area which makes it able to handle a much higher flow than my OEM system, so no worries about pressure losses, and a choice of 3 terminal sizes (AN6, AN8, AN10).
Image

I've had this Edelbrock hose (#8126) since the beginning.
It uses AN6 connections which are compatible with many custom filters.
Connection-wise, I'm almost halfway there!
Image

Later I got this typical aluminium bracket for it, around $10 including shipping.
Image

Also needed some fittings.
Buying these on Ebay can set you back $25 each, but thankfully I wasn't in a hurry so I got them on the cheap, on Aliexpress for less than $5 for each.
The price might have gone up since.
Below, union from AN6 to 5/16" tube, with a compression sleeve fitting which I am very fond of.
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Laid out hardware.
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In the beginning I planned to route-in the hard line with a curve.
Image

But that would have required too tight of a bend for that area.
Image

So I settled for a second elbow.
Image

There is some debate on the optimal (or necessary) filtration.
I've stumbled onto all sorts of opinions, even among fuel professionals.
A typical rule of thumb described here.
Image

Re-usable 100 micron and 40 micron stainless elements are common on the market.
By the way, these look like exactly the same product, even up close.
But with a 60% rated difference they shouldn't. Some of these micron ratings are probably incorrect.
When I looked at the descriptions of OEM replacement filters however, that seemed to indicate a much finer filtration (down to 8 microns, almost enough for viruses :lol:).
Of course I think this is much finer than necessary.
Image

But not to take any chances, I was lucky enough to find a TEN micron cellulose element that just happened to be a perfect fit for my housing.
This is another sign that some more expensive filters probably share the same factories,
but the sellers of these filters are also happy to sell more elements.
I believe the hole diameter has to be 16mm for a perfect fit.
Yes, the input is on the wrong side here, this was corrected during installation.
Image

before I started, I simulated the filter's position in search of the simplest way to suspend the bracket.
Then I unmounted the carb to work indoors.
Image

A few trials. bends and simplifications later, I had this totally non-elegant but very strong steel bracket, which makes good use of the carb's mounting bolts.
I could have found some kind of mounting area on the intake, but this setup allows me to unmount the carb&filter as one unit.
Image

I originally planned for some sort of z-bend to support the filter from underneath, but just a single upwards bend proved sufficient if the filter clamp is mounted sideways.
Basic pipe bender visible on the left.
Image

I cut down the original clamp quite a bit and only used one bolt, but the final hold is plenty strong enough considering the added support at the two ends.
I expected alignment to be tricky, but a design such as this one allowed space for millimeter adjustments using washers, to get everything looking straight.
The bolt is tightened from the first locknut, and the second one has a nylon insert.
I could have put the filter clamp at other positions along the steel bracket but I chose to hold it farther on the right.
Image

Detail of how it's mounted and cut down.
Image

I had acquired a flaring tool for this project, but I couldn't resist these H.Paulin 30-inch 5/16 copper-nickel lines, which were sold with tube nuts and double flares already present on both ends.
Image

At this point I installed the carb back on the car and proceeded to bend the new line.
Image

And voilà!
Bending angles puzzling at first, it took a few tries to get it perfectly aligned with the fitting.
Nonetheless a basic pipe bender wrench worked beautifully.
This setup featured TEN new connections, and I had some worries about it passing so close to the coil & distributor, but the original line did this as well.
I was expecting some leaks but there were none. These AN6 connections are very friendly!
Image

Slightly notched the bracket for the vaccum advance.
Image

Overall view. Feels rock solid!
Image

After this I cranked the car and it wouldn't start. there was no gas at the pump.
I soon realised I had to prime the system, it had been dry for too long.
So I manually siphoned some fuel to the pump and also syringed some down the tube to get the pump wet again,
and it started right up.
Horray!
:smt033

Last edited by denizen44 on Sat Jun 05, 2021 7:57 pm, edited 10 times in total.
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Re: Fuel filter

Postby rick » Sat Apr 10, 2021 9:17 am

Wow. Great photo presentation too. Very interesting read and easy to follow along.

All too often my projects don't make it to the finish line successfully. You're obviously one of those guys who finishes what he starts. Great job.

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Re: Fuel filter

Postby frasern » Sat Apr 10, 2021 11:04 am

Fuel lines from pump to carb were all solid at one time. Some in the '70s had a short hose, with proper flared tubes, and spring clamps. Cutting the tubes for inline filters was a common "field fix" but shouldn't be, in my opinion. I have repaired cut lines, with over tightened gear clamps and cheap inline filters a number of times on cars I have bought, not worth the risk.
Returning to, or converting to a solid line was a good move, and it looks well executed.

Edit, One suggestion, watch the line for vibration with the engine running. If it is, a short bracket from the coil mount, to the tube, could reduce fatigue on the fittings.
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Re: Custom Fuel filter

Postby Mike » Sat Apr 10, 2021 1:21 pm

It looks interesting but I don't see it as an improvement. Its made it that much harder to change the filter and every one of those fittings including the twist open end of the filter housing are all spots for potential fuel leaks.

I do have to say tho it is fun to do a project like this especially when you're actually able to figure out how to complete it :)
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Re: Custom Fuel filter

Postby RMAENV » Sat Apr 10, 2021 11:39 pm

I have a clear glass $20.00 NAPA filter in line before the fuel pump (rubber line). Only clogged it once. Was running the gas out of the car to empty the tank to change the fuel gauge sending unit. I think it is 40 microns and the replacement filters come in a package of 6 for about $10.00
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